Electric Submersible Pump

  1. The Industry Challenge

    Several Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD) operators have observed flow instabilities in their Electrical Submersible Pump (ESP) produced wells, commonly resulting in the complete loss of fluid flow to surface. In some wells these instabilities appear without any apparent precursor signs or indications of a potential flow disturbance, while in other wells there are clear indications of gas entering the pump (e.g. evident by flow and current fluctuations).

  2. It is well known that the presence of gas degrades the hydraulic performance of Electrical Submersible Pumps (ESPs). However, there are no accurate methods for estimating this degradation for multi-stage centrifugal pumps, which makes it challenging for operators to:

    • Select the proper pump model for the application
    • Size the selected system (number of stages, required motor horsepower, etc.)
    • Operate and optimize the installed ESP System (expected vs. measured performance)

    The poor estimation of ESP performance with gas will likely lead to:

  3. The ESP-RIFTS JIP is hosting a technical workshop on April 24, immediately prior to the SPE ESP Symposium (April 25-28), at The Woodlands Waterway Marriott Hotel & Convention Center in The Woodlands. More information on the ESP Symposium is available on www.spe.org/events/en/2017/symposium/17esp/homepage.html

  4. The ESP-RIFTS JIP is hosting a technical workshop on April 24, immediately prior to the SPE ESP Symposium (April 25-28), at The Woodlands Waterway Marriott Hotel & Convention Center in The Woodlands. More information on the ESP Symposium is available on www.spe.org/events/en/2017/symposium/17esp/homepage.html

  5. Course Overview:

    This course will provide attendees with a basic understanding of Reliability Theory and Run-Life Measures, and an overview on the Industry best practices on ESP failure nomenclature, data collection, and data analysis.

    The objectives of this course are to:

  6. This paper was prepared for presentation at the SPE ESP Workshop held inHouston, Texas, USA, April 25-27, 2001.

  7. Abstract

  8. Abstract

    This paper summarizes the results from a high-temperature test program completed in late 2009 and discusses a new electric submersible pumping (ESP) configuration that was validated by ConocoPhillips for operations at 250°C and planned for 2010 field trials. This new prototype ESP system was jointly tested by ConocoPhillips and Schlumberger for 42 days in the C-FER Technologies high-temperature flow loop at fluid temperatures ranging from 150°C to 260°C, and at 250°C and above for approximately 40% of the total time.

  9. Abstract

    Using a visualization prototype built from original Electrical Submersible Pumps (ESP) components and with minimal geometrical modifications, a pioneer experimental procedure was developed and conducted to address the viscous effect on liquid-gas two-phase flow through these types of pumps.

  10. Summary

    Using a visualization prototype built from original electrical-submersible-pump (ESP) components and with minimal geometrical modifications, a pioneer experimental procedure was developed and conducted to address the viscous effect on liquid/gas two-phase flow through these types of pumps.




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