Corrosion

Correct qualification and material selection is even more important when equipment is exposed to H2S-contaminated or other sour gas atmospheres.

These environments are both highly toxic and corrosive.
 
Many materials and products are susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement and stress corrosion cracking. The risk of catastrophic failures significantly increases.

C-FER provides clients with a wide range of sour service testing capabilities that help to understand and minimize various failure...

Abstract

The pipeline industry is moving to embrace more quantitative analysis methods for assessing pipeline integrity and demonstrating the benefits of integrity maintenance programs. Analysis based on structural reliability concepts is ideally suited to this purpose. In the context of corrosion management, the essence of this approach is to combine appropriate failure prediction models, in-line inspection data, the physical and operational characteristics of the pipeline, and corrosion...

Abstract

General corrosion damage can significantly reduce the collapse resistance of externally loaded pressure vessels. This is a consequence of the loss of wall thickness and the associated development of high bending and membrane stresses in the corroded area. A common method used to recover wall thickness is weld buttering, whereby weld material is applied to the affected area. This method is convenient and cost-effective compared to other repair options; however, the extent to which...

Abstract

The risk of pipeline failure is a measure of the state of knowledge of the pipeline; improved knowledge of the pipeline reduces the uncertainty and therefore can reduce the associated risk. Specifically for corrosion defects, the knowledge of the number and size of defects is often obtained using in-line inspection tools which have uncertainty associated with their measurement capabilities. Quantitative Risk Assessment (QRA) is a methodology that objectively assesses a range of...

Abstract

The ability to accurately determine the rate of corrosion growth along a pipeline is an essential input into a number of key integrity management decisions. For example, corrosion rates are needed to predict pipeline reliability (probability of failure and/or probability of exceedance) as a function of time, to identify the need for and timing of field investigations and/or repairs and to determine optimum re-inspection intervals to name just a few applications. As more and more...

Abstract

This paper describes a multi-year PRCI research program that investigated the local buckling (or wrinkling) of onshore pipelines with metal-loss corrosion. The dependence of local buckling resistance on wall thickness suggests that metal-loss defects will considerably reduce such resistance. Due to the lack of experimental data, overly conservative assumptions such as a uniform wall thickness reduction over the entire pipe circumference based on the defect depth have been used in...

Abstract

It is known that, for given pipe material and diameter, collapse capacity of a plain pipe subjected to external pressure is proportional to the second or third power of wall thickness. In lieu of sophisticated numerical models and experimental data, conservative approaches such as those in which thickness losses at corrosion defects are extended to the entire circumference have been adopted in practices to assess the collapse resistance of corroded pipes. This reduced wall thickness...

Abstract

Corrosion control in downhole casing and tubing is a major concern for operators using carbon dioxide (CO2) in enhanced oil recovery schemes. A potential life-cycle cost advantage can be realized by utilizing polymeric liners in these applications. Conventional liners, however, have been shown to be problematic due to their propensity to collapse when the bore is rapidly de-pressurized. A novel solution to this problem has been the development of a grooved liner system. Grooved liners...